WATCH REPLAY: ULA Boeing Starliner Spacecraft Successfully Launched from Cape Canaveral for Historic Trip to ISS

Watch replay of launch on Space Coast Daily TV

WATCH REPLAY: NASA NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test mission successfully launched at 10:52 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, June 5, from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station for a historic mission of about a week to the International Space Station.

BREVARD COUNTY • CAPE CANAVERAL, FLORIDA – NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test mission successfully launched at 10:52 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, June 5, from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station for a historic mission of about a week to the International Space Station.

Technicians and engineers with ULA (United Launch Alliance) worked to assess the ground support equipment at the launch pad that encountered issues during the countdown and scrubbed the June 1 launch attempt.

NASA astronauts Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams are aboard the Boeing Starliner capsule Calyspo, which launched on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket – the first time astronauts have been launched on an Atlas V in its 22-year history.

 

The mission will send Wilmore and Williams to the orbiting laboratory for about a week before Starliner makes a parachute and airbag-assisted landing in the southwestern United States.

This is the first mission for the Starliner spacecraft with a crew on board, which includes the veteran duo of NASA astronauts, who will be on a week-long test flight to the International Space Station. Both Wilmore and Williams are retired U.S. Navy captains who have spent time on the ISS.

Williams will be the pilot for flight test. Williams has spent 322 days in space across two missions: Expedition 14/15 in 2006 through 2007, and Expedition 32/33 in 2012. The Massachusetts native also conducted seven spacewalks, totaling 50 hours and 40 minutes.

Before her career began with NASA in 1998, Williams graduated with her bachelor’s degree in Physical Science from the U.S. Naval Academy, before obtaining her master’s degree in Engineering Management from the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne. In total, she has logged more than 3,000 flight hours in over 30 different aircraft.

After launch from Space Launch Complex-41 and separation from ULA’s Atlas V rocket, Starliner will perform an engine burn to place the spacecraft and its crew into orbit for an approximately 24-hour journey to the space station. If all goes as planned, Starliner will dock on Wednesday, May 8, and then return to Earth up to eight days later. (Boeing image)

The two NASA astronauts are set to make history as the first members aboard Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft to the International Space Station.

As the final flight test for Starliner, NASA’s Boeing Crew Flight Test will validate the transportation system, including the launch pad, rocket, spacecraft, in-orbit operational capabilities, and return to Earth with astronauts aboard.

This is Boeing’s second flight to the International Space Station and third Starliner flight test overall, following a second Orbital Flight Test, the uncrewed mission also known as OFT-2, in May 2022. Boeing also completed pad abort demonstration in November 2019.

The Crew

Suni Williams: Williams will be the pilot for flight test. Williams has spent 322 days in space across two missions: Expedition 14/15 in 2006 through 2007, and Expedition 32/33 in 2012. The Massachusetts native also conducted seven spacewalks, totaling 50 hours and 40 minutes.

Before her career began with NASA in 1998, Williams graduated with her bachelor’s degree in Physical Science from the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, before obtaining her master’s degree in Engineering Management from the Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne. In total, she has logged more than 3,000 flight hours in over 30 different aircraft.

Butch Wilmore: Wilmore will be the commander for the mission. A veteran of two spaceflights, Wilmore has 178 days in space under his belt. In 2009, he served as a pilot aboard space shuttle Atlantis for STS-129. Additionally, Wilmore served as a flight engineer for Expedition 41 until November 2014, when he assumed command of the station upon arrival of the Expedition 42 crew. He returned to Earth the following March.

Prior to being selected by NASA in 2000, the father of two obtained both his bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, before graduating with another master’s degree in Aviation Systems from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

He is also a graduate of the United States Naval Test Pilot School, Patuxent River, Maryland, and has completed four operational deployments during his tenure as a fleet naval officer and aviator.